Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ

Answering questions that help you understand and manage your supply chain.

When clients ask questions we respond. Here you’ll find great information across all sorts of supply chain topics.

Q

Why do I need to fill out a POA (Power of Attorney) to do business with Juno?

A

A power of attorney (POA) is a legal document used in shipping to grant a customs broker the authority to process customs clearance on your behalf. A signed POA is necessary in order to clear your goods through US Customs. A POA allows you to appoint a person or organization (in this case Juno Logistics & Juno Customs Solutions) to manage your import shipments, as well as to clear customs, on your behalf.

Q

What is the Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS)?

A

The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS or simply HTS) is a hierarchical structure for determining tariff classifications for goods imported into the United States. Goods are classified based on name, use, and/or material, and is assigned a ten-digit classification code. You can read more about HTS classification here: General Rules of Interpretation: How to Determine HTS Codes | Juno Logistics

Q

What is FTL & LTL? What is the difference between the two?

A

Full truckload, frequently abbreviated as FTL, refers to a shipment that takes up an entire freight truck by itself. FTL is reserved for larger shipments, as well as high-risk shipments. FTL shipping times are typically quicker, due to the package being delivered directly from the source to the destination without requiring additional stops.

Less than truckload, or LTL, refers to a shipment taking up less than the entire truck. LTL shipping is usually a great choice for small business that don’t ship in large quantities. LTL shipping times are typically a bit longer than FTL, due to the truck carrying multiple shipments and requiring multiple stops.

Q

What is a chassis split, why is there a cost associated, and why am I being billed waiting time in addition?

A

A chassis is the special trailer or undercarriage used to transport ocean containers over the road. A chassis split describes when the container is located in a different place than the chassis, in which case the trucking company may apply a chassis split fee to cover the expense of bring the chassis to the location of the container. Factors that contribute to a chassis split fee being applied include:

  • If chassis availability is limited or depots become congested
  • Pick-ups from and deliveries to certain depots trigger at least one chassis split
  • “Grounded” rail yards or depots (where containers are stacked to maximize storage) may not stock on-site chassis, requiring drivers to source off-site equipment before attempting a pick-up
  • Transportation instructions from ocean lines can change multiple times on any given day resulting in chassis splits

Part of a chassis split fee may include paying for time drivers sit idle. Once a chassis is secured, there may be a delay waiting for the container to be lifted into place. Waiting time fees have become even more frequent with the introduction the electronic logging device (ELD) used to record the driver’s record of duty status (RODS) previously captured in paper logbooks.

Q

How much weight can a trailer hold and what is legal?

A

Every US state has a Department of Transportation that takes guidance from the Federal Department of Transportation, so trailer weight and size limits vary from state to state. You can find the exact limits for each state here: Compilation of Existing State Truck Size and Weight Limit Laws – Appendix A: State Truck Size and Weight Laws – FHWA Freight Management and Operations (dot.gov)

Q

What are incoterms?

illustration - air freight shipping containers

A

Incoterms (International Commercial Terms) are a set of globally recognized trade rules, guidelines and shipping terms published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). Originally issued in 1936, Incoterms have been regularly updated to address changes in the international trade industry. In short, Incoterms are a useful set of guidelines to help buyers and sellers reach an understanding of each party’s responsibilities and liabilities well before a shipment takes place. Read more here: What You Should Know About Incoterms | Juno Logistics

Q

What is the CARM program?

A

CARM, stands for CBSA’s (Canada Border Services Agency) Assessment and Revenue Management. CARM aims to update how CBSA collects, manages, and reports on import revenue and trade information and will be rolled out in phases through June 2022. CARM will involve rigorous compliance requirements, but the dedicated Licensed Customs Brokers at Juno Customs Solutions can help guide you through the new CARM requirements.

Q

My sourcing comes from a Free Trade Agreement country. What do I need for seamless import?

A

If the country you are sourcing from has a Free Trade Agreement with the United States it does not mean all products qualify. Preferential trade agreements require back up documents and they may also have expiration dates. You can find more information on this topic here: https://www.trade.gov/free-trade-agreement-overview. To ensure a seamless import, we strongly recommend consulting with our team of experienced licensed customs brokers.